sognidibellaitalia:

Did Eve eat an apple?
Piazza Cordusio is a square in central Milan, Italy. It is well known for its several turn-of-the-19th-century Neoclassical and Art Nouveau buildings, banks and post offices. It is still an important commercial square in the city and hosts the Palazzo delle Assicurazioni Generali, Palace of the Italiano and Stock exchange of Milan. Piazzale Cordusio hosts the Cordusio metro station and is the starting point of the elegant pedestrian Via Dante which leads to the imposing Milan Castle. Opposite to Via Dante, Cordusio borders onto Piazza Mercanti, former city centre in the Middle Ages, which leads directly to Piazza del Duomo, today’s city centre. Palazzo delle Assicurazioni Generali is located at the Cordusio square and was built by architect Luca Beltrami from 1897 to 1901. It is the main headquarter of the mega-finance corporation Assicurazioni Generali. It has a small tower with a dome. Photo of the mosaic on the facade of the Generali Piazza Cordusio Milano. The Tree of the knowledge of good and evil where Eve takes an red apple. But did Eve Eat an Apple?
 (by B℮n)

sognidibellaitalia:

Did Eve eat an apple?

Piazza Cordusio is a square in central Milan, Italy. It is well known for its several turn-of-the-19th-century Neoclassical and Art Nouveau buildings, banks and post offices. It is still an important commercial square in the city and hosts the Palazzo delle Assicurazioni Generali, Palace of the Italiano and Stock exchange of Milan. Piazzale Cordusio hosts the Cordusio metro station and is the starting point of the elegant pedestrian Via Dante which leads to the imposing Milan Castle. Opposite to Via Dante, Cordusio borders onto Piazza Mercanti, former city centre in the Middle Ages, which leads directly to Piazza del Duomo, today’s city centre.

Palazzo delle Assicurazioni Generali is located at the Cordusio square and was built by architect Luca Beltrami from 1897 to 1901. It is the main headquarter of the mega-finance corporation Assicurazioni Generali. It has a small tower with a dome. Photo of the mosaic on the facade of the Generali Piazza Cordusio Milano. The Tree of the knowledge of good and evil where Eve takes an red apple. But did Eve Eat an Apple?


(by B℮n)

Miami - South Beach: Hotel Victor

Hotel Victor, at 1144 Ocean Drive, was designed by L/ Murray Dixon and first opened its doors in 1937. After closing in the mid 1960s, the Victor underwent a $48 million re-imagining by internationally renowned decorator Jacques Garcia—his first hotel in the Americas—and was reopened in 2003. The sexy 91-room boutique hotel stands apart from the cookie cutter minimalist South Beach hotels with its bold colors and rich fabrics. The decadent lobby features a Moulin Rouge color palette with backlit painted glass, gauzy curtains, and ying-yang-shaped velvet footstools. Vix, the Hotel Victor’s upscale bistro, and its Turkish Spa, with its large, unisex steam room, Turkish hammam, and heated marble slabs, are hot spots for fabulati.
The Miami Beach Architectural District, also known as Old Miami Beach Historic District, or the more common, Miami Beach Art Deco District, is roughly bounded by the Atlantic Ocean, Alton Road and Collins Canal/Dade Boulevard and 5th Street. With 960 vibrantly colored historic buildings, it contains the largest concentration of 1920s and 1930s resort architecture in the United States.
Miami Beach Architectural District #79000667 (1979)

 (by wallyg)

Miami - South Beach: Hotel Victor

Hotel Victor, at 1144 Ocean Drive, was designed by L/ Murray Dixon and first opened its doors in 1937. After closing in the mid 1960s, the Victor underwent a $48 million re-imagining by internationally renowned decorator Jacques Garcia—his first hotel in the Americas—and was reopened in 2003. The sexy 91-room boutique hotel stands apart from the cookie cutter minimalist South Beach hotels with its bold colors and rich fabrics. The decadent lobby features a Moulin Rouge color palette with backlit painted glass, gauzy curtains, and ying-yang-shaped velvet footstools. Vix, the Hotel Victor’s upscale bistro, and its Turkish Spa, with its large, unisex steam room, Turkish hammam, and heated marble slabs, are hot spots for fabulati.

The Miami Beach Architectural District, also known as Old Miami Beach Historic District, or the more common, Miami Beach Art Deco District, is roughly bounded by the Atlantic Ocean, Alton Road and Collins Canal/Dade Boulevard and 5th Street. With 960 vibrantly colored historic buildings, it contains the largest concentration of 1920s and 1930s resort architecture in the United States.

Miami Beach Architectural District #79000667 (1979)

(by wallyg)

francophiles:

Mers-les-Bains, Somme, Picardie, France: Front de mer composé de superbes villas de la”Belle Epoque” et de style”Art Nouveau”, Sea front composite of magnificent villas of the “Belle Epoque” and of style “Art nouveau” (by Histgeo)

francophiles:

Mers-les-Bains, Somme, Picardie, France: Front de mer composé de superbes villas de la”Belle Epoque” et de style”Art Nouveau”, Sea front composite of magnificent villas of the “Belle Epoque” and of style “Art nouveau” (by Histgeo)

The Mauretania, Milton J. Black, Architect 1934 

A gem of the Streamline Moderne Style, the Mauretania was designed for actor Jack Haley (the ‘Tin Man’ in ‘The Wizard of Oz’) and his wife Flo. The pair lived in the penthouse apartment for twenty years. The rounded exterior walls and second floor balconies with railings suggest a luxury ocean-going liner.
During the summer of 1960, Senator John F. Kennedy occupied the penthouse during the Democratic National Convention.
The Mauretania is located at 520-522 N. Rossmore Avenue in the Hancock Park neighborhood of Los Angeles.

(by Michael Locke)

The Mauretania, Milton J. Black, Architect 1934 

A gem of the Streamline Moderne Style, the Mauretania was designed for actor Jack Haley (the ‘Tin Man’ in ‘The Wizard of Oz’) and his wife Flo. The pair lived in the penthouse apartment for twenty years. The rounded exterior walls and second floor balconies with railings suggest a luxury ocean-going liner.

During the summer of 1960, Senator John F. Kennedy occupied the penthouse during the Democratic National Convention.

The Mauretania is located at 520-522 N. Rossmore Avenue in the Hancock Park neighborhood of Los Angeles.

(by Michael Locke)

cafesteam:

The Black Friar pub, London EC4 - Art Nouveau interior - Window
The Black Friar at 174 Queen Victoria Street, EC4 is a narrow ‘flat-iron’ wedge shaped pub, built in 1875 near the site of a thirteenth century Dominican Priory. A masterpiece of Art-Nouveau styling and the only pub of it’s type in London, it was saved from the 1960s bulldozers only by an outcry led by Sir John Betjeman, who later became the Poet Laureate. The outside was decorated by Royal Academy sculpror Henry Poole (1873-1928) in 1903 and the pub’s name is proudly displayed in mosaic tiles. Though unusual and pleasing, the exterior does not prepare you for the extraordinary interior. The ground floor interior was remodelled in 1905 by H. Fuller Clark, using multi-coloured marble, mosaics, bronze reliefs of jolly-looking monks, and decorative touches such as the elaborate fire-basket with goblin ends. Above the fireplace, a large bas-relief bronze depicts frolicking friars singing carols and playing instruments. Another called ‘Saturday Afternoon’ shows them gathering grapes and harvesting apples. More monks are collecting fish and eels for their meatless days, while one is just about to boil an egg! Three low arches lead into a smaller bar, added after the First World War. Below a beautiful arched mosaic ceiling, are mottos of wisdom, such as, ‘finery is foolery’ and ‘don’t advertise, tell a gossip’ together with .’haste is slow’ and ‘industry is all’. Even the light fittings are carved wooden monks carrying yokes on their shoulders, from which the lights hang. The Black Friar’s interior is literally a work of art. It was begun in 1904, with sculptors Nathaniel Hitch, Frederick T. Callcott and Henry Poole contributing to its glory.
(by garethr1)

cafesteam:

The Black Friar pub, London EC4 - Art Nouveau interior - Window

The Black Friar at 174 Queen Victoria Street, EC4 is a narrow ‘flat-iron’ wedge shaped pub, built in 1875 near the site of a thirteenth century Dominican Priory. A masterpiece of Art-Nouveau styling and the only pub of it’s type in London, it was saved from the 1960s bulldozers only by an outcry led by Sir John Betjeman, who later became the Poet Laureate.

The outside was decorated by Royal Academy sculpror Henry Poole (1873-1928) in 1903 and the pub’s name is proudly displayed in mosaic tiles. Though unusual and pleasing, the exterior does not prepare you for the extraordinary interior. The ground floor interior was remodelled in 1905 by H. Fuller Clark, using multi-coloured marble, mosaics, bronze reliefs of jolly-looking monks, and decorative touches such as the elaborate fire-basket with goblin ends. Above the fireplace, a large bas-relief bronze depicts frolicking friars singing carols and playing instruments. Another called ‘Saturday Afternoon’ shows them gathering grapes and harvesting apples. More monks are collecting fish and eels for their meatless days, while one is just about to boil an egg!

Three low arches lead into a smaller bar, added after the First World War. Below a beautiful arched mosaic ceiling, are mottos of wisdom, such as, ‘finery is foolery’ and ‘don’t advertise, tell a gossip’ together with .’haste is slow’ and ‘industry is all’.
Even the light fittings are carved wooden monks carrying yokes on their shoulders, from which the lights hang.

The Black Friar’s interior is literally a work of art. It was begun in 1904, with sculptors Nathaniel Hitch, Frederick T. Callcott and Henry Poole contributing to its glory.

(by garethr1)

Barcelona 

Casa Teresa Vallhonrat
Architect: Francesc Ferriol i Carreras

 (by Arnim Schulz)

Barcelona

Casa Teresa Vallhonrat

Architect: Francesc Ferriol i Carreras

(by Arnim Schulz)

Arizona Biltmore Hotel & Spa, Albert Chase McArthur, Architect; Frank Lloyd Wright, Consultant 1929 (by Michael Locke)

Arizona Biltmore Hotel & Spa, Albert Chase McArthur, Architect; Frank Lloyd Wright, Consultant 1929 (by Michael Locke)

Montréal. Le 3849, rue Saint-Hubert. (by DubyDub2009)

Montréal. Le 3849, rue Saint-Hubert. (by DubyDub2009)

Pink Bathroom in a home built in 1936.
(by john4kc)

Pink Bathroom in a home built in 1936.

(by john4kc)

Casa Comalat - Barcelona

Window of the Casa Comalat (1906-1911) by the modernist architect Salvador Valeri i Pupurull. Another view of the window or the outstandig backside façade (via Casa Comalat - Barcelona | Flickr - Photo Sharing!)

Casa Comalat - Barcelona

Window of the Casa Comalat (1906-1911) by the modernist architect Salvador Valeri i Pupurull. Another view of the window or the outstandig backside façade (via Casa Comalat - Barcelona | Flickr - Photo Sharing!)

decoarchitecture:

Verizon Building, NYC, New Yorkvia Investors.com
From a business article on condo conversions. This is the lobby of a former telecommunications building in TriBeCa that is now super upscale condos. As a resident of a two condo conversions (first a historic bank building, then a former luxury office building), I approve, though maybe not of $2 million condos. -Wendy
From the article:

A decade ago, developers nationwide were busy snatching up apartment buildings and converting the units to condominiums to cash in on rapidly rising home prices supported by low interest rates and lax mortgage underwriting standards.The strategy still stands as a testament to the fervent homeownership boom, which ended abruptly — and messily — amid the financial crisis, the bursting of the housing price bubble and the collapse of the condo mortgage industry. The fallout largely led to foreclosures and bankruptcies, as developers were unable to unload the units.But now, with demand for residential ownership ratcheting up in major markets where the emphasis for years has been on apartment development, condo conversions are making a comeback.

decoarchitecture:

Verizon Building, NYC, New York
via Investors.com

From a business article on condo conversions. This is the lobby of a former telecommunications building in TriBeCa that is now super upscale condos. As a resident of a two condo conversions (first a historic bank building, then a former luxury office building), I approve, though maybe not of $2 million condos. -Wendy

From the article:

A decade ago, developers nationwide were busy snatching up apartment buildings and converting the units to condominiums to cash in on rapidly rising home prices supported by low interest rates and lax mortgage underwriting standards.

The strategy still stands as a testament to the fervent homeownership boom, which ended abruptly — and messily — amid the financial crisis, the bursting of the housing price bubble and the collapse of the condo mortgage industry. The fallout largely led to foreclosures and bankruptcies, as developers were unable to unload the units.

But now, with demand for residential ownership ratcheting up in major markets where the emphasis for years has been on apartment development, condo conversions are making a comeback.

Turkey Cafe (1900-1) by Arthur Wakerley  (by stevecadman)

Turkey Cafe (1900-1) by Arthur Wakerley (by stevecadman)

decoarchitecture:

S… San Antonio
San Antonio, TexasPhoto by Debra Jane Seltzer
Fab streamline house in San Antonio.

decoarchitecture:

S… San Antonio

San Antonio, Texas
Photo by Debra Jane Seltzer

Fab streamline house in San Antonio.

sognidibellaitalia:

Milano, Casa Galimberti, balcone (by forastico)

sognidibellaitalia:

Milano, Casa Galimberti, balcone (by forastico)

NIGHTNIGHT by DEDDY