Hyde Park War Memorial & The Pool of Reflections. (by nikabuz)

Hyde Park War Memorial & The Pool of Reflections. (by nikabuz)

decoarchitecture:

Lobby, 140 West Street, NYC, New YorkPhoto by Michael Nagle for the New York Times
Utterly stunning lobby. Photo from a NYT article on adaptive reuse of historic buildings. As a resident of a 101-year-old former office building, I totally support this. -Wendy 
From the article, which appeared in July

But the 31-story Verizon building at 140 West Street, across from One World Trade Center in the financial district, may be the grandest of the bunch.
The full-block 1927 edifice, which like the other two phone buildings was designed by Ralph Walker, a prominent Art Deco architect, has an exterior lavishly decorated with carvings of vines, flowers and birds; it is a landmark, as is its vividly finished lobby, whose walls are trimmed in gold paint.
Upstairs, the developers the Magnum Real Estate Group and the CIM Group are adding 161 condos, from one- to five-bedrooms, in a project called Barclay Square, which will have the address of 100 Barclay Street, after the developers create a new entrance out of a loading bay.
The units are expected to hit the market in September, for $2,100 to $3,000 a square foot, said Ben Shaoul, Magnum’s president, although the offering plan for the $500 million project still awaits approval.
Phone companies need less equipment these days, but Verizon isn’t leaving completely; it will retain Floors 1 to 10 in a sharing arrangement similar to the Walker and Stella towers.
But to offer 47,000 square feet of amenity space, Magnum will avail itself of about half of that gilded lobby, which will be walled off and turned into a lounge. Residents will be able to enjoy their morning coffee, Mr. Shaoul said, under murals of the history of communication. One painting on the condo’s side shows a megaphone-carrying Egyptian. “You couldn’t build a space like this today,” he said.

decoarchitecture:

Lobby, 140 West Street, NYC, New York
Photo by Michael Nagle for the New York Times

Utterly stunning lobby. Photo from a NYT article on adaptive reuse of historic buildings. As a resident of a 101-year-old former office building, I totally support this. -Wendy 

From the article, which appeared in July

But the 31-story Verizon building at 140 West Street, across from One World Trade Center in the financial district, may be the grandest of the bunch.

The full-block 1927 edifice, which like the other two phone buildings was designed by Ralph Walker, a prominent Art Deco architect, has an exterior lavishly decorated with carvings of vines, flowers and birds; it is a landmark, as is its vividly finished lobby, whose walls are trimmed in gold paint.

Upstairs, the developers the Magnum Real Estate Group and the CIM Group are adding 161 condos, from one- to five-bedrooms, in a project called Barclay Square, which will have the address of 100 Barclay Street, after the developers create a new entrance out of a loading bay.

The units are expected to hit the market in September, for $2,100 to $3,000 a square foot, said Ben Shaoul, Magnum’s president, although the offering plan for the $500 million project still awaits approval.

Phone companies need less equipment these days, but Verizon isn’t leaving completely; it will retain Floors 1 to 10 in a sharing arrangement similar to the Walker and Stella towers.

But to offer 47,000 square feet of amenity space, Magnum will avail itself of about half of that gilded lobby, which will be walled off and turned into a lounge. Residents will be able to enjoy their morning coffee, Mr. Shaoul said, under murals of the history of communication. One painting on the condo’s side shows a megaphone-carrying Egyptian. “You couldn’t build a space like this today,” he said.

Nancy et l’Art Nouveau - Graineterie Génin-Louis (via Nancy 121 | Flickr - Photo Sharing!)

Nancy et l’Art Nouveau - Graineterie Génin-Louis (via Nancy 121 | Flickr - Photo Sharing!)

Frinton-on-sea September 2014

Gateway to art deco house in Frinton Park Estate, planned as a major development of modernist/ art deco houses in the 1930’s. Only a small part of the scheme was realised, with a dozen or so houses being built between 1934 and 1936. Architect - Oliver Hill

 (by Yekkes)

Frinton-on-sea September 2014

Gateway to art deco house in Frinton Park Estate, planned as a major development of modernist/ art deco houses in the 1930’s. Only a small part of the scheme was realised, with a dozen or so houses being built between 1934 and 1936. Architect - Oliver Hill

(by Yekkes)

Niagara Mohawk Building ~ Syracuse NY ~ Art Deco Facade
Art Deco was the hot architectural style in America during the 1920s and 1930s. The style is characterized by features like smooth wall surfaces (often shiny metal), with zigzags, chevrons, and other geometric motifs as decorative elements on the façade. The geometric motifs usually emphasize verticality, which is often enhanced by adding towers and vertical projections. Even figure sculptures display an angular geometric approach. One of the best examples of Art Deco style in New York State, and arguably in America, is the Niagara Mohawk Building in Syracuse. This dramatic seven-story structure, which is the headquarters of the Niagara Mohawk Power Company at 300 Erie Boulevard West, was built in 1932. It was designed by the Buffalo architectural firm of Bley & Lyman and the Syracuse architect Melvin L. King. The façade is constructed of gray brick and stone in a series of setbacks, with additional cladding in stainless steel, aluminum, and black glass. The ornamentation is truly opulent. There are parallel bands, zigzags, and chevrons. At the base of the tower six stories above the entrance, there is a 28-foot-high statue of a male figure with outstretched arms from which rays of light emanate like giant wings. The stunning sculpture is called, “Spirit of Light.” Niagara Mohawk gleams, shimmering in daylight and glittering at night with interior lighting and powerful exterior flood illumination.
 300 Erie Boulevard West,Syracuse, New York
 It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places as the Niagara Hudson Building in 2010. The building was listed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places in June, 2010. The listing was announced as the featured listing in the National Park Service’s weekly list of June 25, 2010. The building was built in 1932. It was headquarters for what was “then the nation’s largest electric utility company”. It was nominated by New York State’s Board of Historic Preservation for listing on the National Register of Historic Places in December, 2009. The Board described the building as “‘an outstanding example of Art Deco architecture and a symbol of the Age of Electricity.
(by Onasill)

Niagara Mohawk Building ~ Syracuse NY ~ Art Deco Facade

Art Deco was the hot architectural style in America during the 1920s and 1930s. The style is characterized by features like smooth wall surfaces (often shiny metal), with zigzags, chevrons, and other geometric motifs as decorative elements on the façade. The geometric motifs usually emphasize verticality, which is often enhanced by adding towers and vertical projections. Even figure sculptures display an angular geometric approach. One of the best examples of Art Deco style in New York State, and arguably in America, is the Niagara Mohawk Building in Syracuse. This dramatic seven-story structure, which is the headquarters of the Niagara Mohawk Power Company at 300 Erie Boulevard West, was built in 1932. It was designed by the Buffalo architectural firm of Bley & Lyman and the Syracuse architect Melvin L. King. The façade is constructed of gray brick and stone in a series of setbacks, with additional cladding in stainless steel, aluminum, and black glass. The ornamentation is truly opulent. There are parallel bands, zigzags, and chevrons. At the base of the tower six stories above the entrance, there is a 28-foot-high statue of a male figure with outstretched arms from which rays of light emanate like giant wings. The stunning sculpture is called, “Spirit of Light.” Niagara Mohawk gleams, shimmering in daylight and glittering at night with interior lighting and powerful exterior flood illumination.


300 Erie Boulevard West,Syracuse, New York


It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places as the Niagara Hudson Building in 2010.
The building was listed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places in June, 2010. The listing was announced as the featured listing in the National Park Service’s weekly list of June 25, 2010.
The building was built in 1932. It was headquarters for what was “then the nation’s largest electric utility company”.
It was nominated by New York State’s Board of Historic Preservation for listing on the National Register of Historic Places in December, 2009. The Board described the building as “‘an outstanding example of Art Deco architecture and a symbol of the Age of Electricity.

(by Onasill)

Modernista is Spanish name for Art Nouveau style. This house’ Spanish name is Casa-Museo Modernista, currently owned by a bank. This is the richly decorated dining room. (via 500px / Modernista House Museum, Novelda, Spain by Bostonian HDR)

Modernista is Spanish name for Art Nouveau style. This house’ Spanish name is Casa-Museo Modernista, currently owned by a bank. This is the richly decorated dining room. (via 500px / Modernista House Museum, Novelda, Spain by Bostonian HDR)

americanroads:

Abandoned movie theater1154 Main St. Hellertown, PA 18055

americanroads:

Abandoned movie theater
1154 Main St. Hellertown, PA 18055

Gresham Palace - Interior Detail (by pov_steve)

Gresham Palace - Interior Detail (by pov_steve)

53009 Mucha moonlight study (by aeillill)

53009 Mucha moonlight study (by aeillill)

cafesteam:

Design in art………………… (by LaTur)

cafesteam:

Design in art………………… (by LaTur)

cafesteam:

Town Hall of Bremen, Bremen, Germany. Redecorated in 1905 by Heinrich Vogeler in Art Nouveau style. (via 500px / The Golden Chamber by Bernhard Sonderhuesken)

cafesteam:

Town Hall of Bremen, Bremen, Germany. Redecorated in 1905 by Heinrich Vogeler in Art Nouveau style. (via 500px / The Golden Chamber by Bernhard Sonderhuesken)

cafesteam:

Luca Brasi’s Last Stand (by Eddie C3)

cafesteam:

Luca Brasi’s Last Stand (by Eddie C3)

NIGHTNIGHT by DEDDY